Moment of Brilliance: When is a store not a store? When it’s on EMC.com

 

Add it all up and the whole experience has the elegance of a beautifully balanced ecommerce click stream that is really a product marketing tour de force.

Dell.com and Adobe.com top the 2014 ecommerce usability hit parade -- with Oracle.com bringing in the 3rd good practice ranking. It's declining averages for everyone else. Thus far, Dell.com is winning the ecommerce race this year with a 78 point average usability score (80 points is a Best Practice) and a whopping 90.4% of target features, capabilities and doodads.

With 74.5 points, Adobe.com’s usability is nearly as slick, leaving Oracle.com as the only other site on the Index that hits the good practice ecommerce mark.

That was why we spied EMC.com’s “Store” link with some delight. We figured there might be a new ecommerce contender in town.

And then we realized EMC.com’s “Store” isn’t an ecommerce play at all.

Instead, it’s an “ecommerce” horse of a totally different color. Rather that present products to be plopped into a shopping cart and purchased online, the EMC.com Store serves as a muse for visitors to explore products, compare them, configure and select options (as you would if buying), and then submit a form and receive a quote from an EMC salesperson or a reseller.

In other words, it’s an online catalog that behaves much like a classic

[ecommerce] store.

And that, as it turns out, is a bit of product marketing sleight of hand that shouldn’t be missed. Here’s why.

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Category: Case Study and Video Review

Class: Moment of Brilliance

Websites Profiled: EMC

Related Research:

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2017-03-01T17:53:23+00:00

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I focus on strategy and trends – and how the Web turns business rules on their heads. My job is to identify the Web-related trends and best practices that will change your world over the next 18 months. Where you need to cut through the clutter of conventional wisdom. How to change the competitive rules of the game. More gory details in my profile -- and unvarnished opinions about the sites we evaluate on Google+