Intel.com’s latest redesign is like buying an exotic car. It is visually striking, can be fun to drive, and has more bells and whistles than other cars on the road.

But going exotic has tradeoffs. Passing on purchasing the full options package can leave the driving experience far less exciting than advertised. In fact, it may even break down — always in inconvenient locations.

And the unique controls and design that seems edgy and innovative in the beginning quickly become confusing and irritating.

In this Don’t Miss/Don’t Bother review we take the new Intel.com site for a drive.

Kenna Dian | Don’t Bother

I really want to buy Intel.com’s exotic new design. But in the end, I simply can’t afford the time, effort and resources I need to invest to make it work. Some of my biggest gripes are:

The product content is like a Chinese dinner. There’s a nice selection of information available, but it is difficult to find anything really substantial.

One of the culprits here is that Intel.com uses the F1 space on product gateway pages as the main link to product overviews. Unfortunately, Website users have already learned to ignore these features since they usually deliver little more than announcements, articles, and strategy content.

2011 | Visitors outfitted with all the apps and options to make the site work and have some leisure time to learn the site’s idiosyncrasies are in for a nice trip.

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Category: Case Study

Class: Don’t Miss/Don’t Bother Review

Websites Profiled: Intel.com

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